Art Galleries

Tammy Rae Carland

When: May 27-June 18 2016

Last year, the Express wrote about a book of photography by Oakland artist Tammy Rae Carland called Some of Us Did Not Die (see “What Was Withheld: Tammy Rae Carland’s ‘Some of Us Did Not Die,’” 10/21/15). The book, like much of Carland’s work during her prolific career, poetically addressed the complicated politics of queer identity and the ways that marginalized communities in general are erased from dominant narratives. The book included ephemera from throughout Carland’s early life, when she made seminal contributions to the riot grrrl and queercore scenes with her zines. Since, Carland (who is now the provost of the California College of the Arts) has taken up many projects and aesthetics, from her late-Nineties series of self portraits in which she performed identities inspired by her parents, to her 2013 “discograms,” which monochromatically captured the ecstatic reflections off a disco ball on large, photosensitive paper. Now, Jessica Silverman Gallery South (488 Ellis St., San Francisco) — a temporary project space across the from the main Jessica Silverman Gallery — is showing a mini retrospective of her provocative career, simply titled Tammy Rae Carland. There will be a reception this Friday, May 27, from 6–8 p.m.

Sarah Burke

Price: Free.

Add a review

Rating

Select a star to rate.

Anonymous and pseudonymous comments will be removed.