Friday, January 17, 2020

Friday's Briefing: Alameda County gets $38 million to help homeless; Bloomberg has coffee with Schaaf

JetBlue ends service at Oakland Airport

by Steven Tavares
Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg met with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf on Friday. Did they talk about endorsements? - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
  • Wikimedia Commons
  • Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg met with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf on Friday. Did they talk about endorsements?


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 17-19:

1. Fifteen FEMA trailers to house up to 70 people rolled into Oakland on Thursday. In addition to the temporary housing, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that Alameda County is receiving $38 million in state aid for the homeless, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Oakland is receiving $19.7 million of the total. $$

2. Housing advocate's hopes were buoyed on Thursday when Senate Bill 50, the high-profile and controversial legislation that aims to increase housing density around transit centers, was approved by a committee that voted against a similar version of the bill last year, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

3. In the aftermath of "Moms 4 Housing," Oakland Council President Rebecca Kaplan thinks the city should purchase a number of properties in Oakland that will soon be going to auction for non-payment of county property taxes, the East Bay Citizen reports.

4. Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg visited downtown Oakland on Friday morning and had coffee with Mayor Libby Schaaf, the East Bay Times reports. Bloomberg then headed to a fundraiser at Everett & Jones BBQ near Jack London Square. Was Bloomberg trying to nab an endorsement from Schaaf? She's a free-agent after being an early endorser of Sen. Kamala Harris' campaign. $$

5. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sued the Trump administration in an effort to stop the issuance of new permits for oil and gas production in the state, including fracking, the Associated Press reports. On Wednesday, some Alameda County elected officials urged Gov. Gavin Newsom to ban all oil and gas production in the state, the East Bay Citizen reports.

6. The Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Joint Powers Authority voted early Friday morning to rescind its $1 million a year stadium naming-rights deal with RingCentral, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The move comes after former JPA Executive Director Scott McKibben was charged with felony conflict-of-interest when he sought $50,000 from the company to negotiate the contract. The JPA is now negotiating a new contract with RingCentral. $$

7. Another airline carrier is ditching the Oakland Airport. JetBlue announced it will end service at the airport on April 29, SFGate reports. The loss of JetBlue means the Oakland Airport will no longer have a direct flight available to New York City.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Thursday's Briefing: FEMA trailers coming to Oakland to help homeless; Skinner bill to limit excessive CEO pay moves forward

Fake parking tickets in Alameda

by Steven Tavares
Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 4:00 AM

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, center. - STATE SENATE
  • State Senate
  • State Sen. Nancy Skinner, center.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 16:

1. A few dozen FEMA trailers are heading to East Oakland as Gov. Gavin Newsom visits the city to talk more about his plan for combating homelessness in the state, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The trailers are coming to Hegenberger Road in Oakland near the Coliseum. $$

2. A state Senate committee moved forward legislation that would tax some of the state's largest companies. But the amount of the tax would be commensurate with how much the chief executive makes, the Associated Press reports. The bill is authored by East Bay state Sen. Nancy Skinner.

3. Student teachers at U.C. Berkeley asserted they were illegally underpaid. Backed by the union, they won an arbitration decision that forces the university to pay them back retroactively, KQED reports. The total amount of wages could be "several million dollars."

4. PG&E was successful in clearing only 60 percent of the brush and other debris from its system, Bloomberg News reports. The disclosure was revealed in federal bankruptcy court. Trees and other dry vegetation is believed to have caused several large and devastating wildfires in Northern California over the past few years.

5. A prankster is putting fake parking citations on cars in Alameda that look like the real thing, SFGate reports. Alameda Police alerted the public to fake tickets on Twitter. The fine print of the citation reads, "This ticket was issued by a concerned citizen and is not an actual fine. This ticket is for entertainment purposes only."

6. Following the New Year's Eve homicide in Oakland's Montclair District that was precipitated by a laptop computer being stolen from Starbucks, Bay Area "laptop hobos" are on high alert. Local police said the rise in laptop thefts is related to a booming black market in Asia, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Wednesday's Briefing: Richmond bans coal shipments; House to vote on Barbara Lee's repeal of 'endless war' authorization

Swalwell passed over as impeachment manager in the Senate

by Steven Tavares
Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Rep. Barbara Lee during a House floor speech to oppose the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force.
  • Rep. Barbara Lee during a House floor speech to oppose the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 15.

1. The Richmond City Council voted Tuesday night to ban the shipment of coal through its Levin Terminal, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The action comes amid legal threats.

2. The last Democratic presidential debate before the Iowa Caucus was surprisingly devoid of conflict among the virtually even field of candidates, The New York Times reports. Oakland Rep. Barbara Lee, meanwhile, was again name-dropped by Sen. Bernie Sanders and Tom Steyer for her famous lone vote against authorizing war in 2001.

3. About that 2001 vote against the Authorization of Use for Military Force: The House will vote on a bill introduced by Lee to repeal the AUMF sometime next week, Politico reports.

4. Speaker Nancy Pelosi choose South Bay Rep. Zoe Lofgren among seven impeachment managers as the Senate moves closer to a trial for President Trump, Politicoreports. Somewhat surprisingly, Pelosi passed over East Bay Rep. Eric Swalwell, a former Alameda County prosecutor and vociferous opponent of Trump.

5. Alameda County supervisors approved a ban on the sale of flavored tobacco, including menthol, in the unincorporated areas, the East Bay Citizen reports. The ordinance also enacts a tobacco licensing fee on retailers, which may end up to be around $800 a year.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Tuesday's Briefing: Sheriff evicts Moms 4 Housing members, arrests made; A constitutional amendment to end homelessness?

Lee: Democratic debate rules discriminate against candidates of color

by Steven Tavares
Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 4:00 AM

A homeless encampment in Oakland. - HAYDEN BRITTON
  • Hayden Britton
  • A homeless encampment in Oakland.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 14:

1. Moms 4 Housing members were evicted by Alameda County sheriff's deputies early Tuesday morning from the West Oakland home they were occupying without permission of its owners, a Southern California investment group, the East Bay Times reports. Four arrests were made. $$

2. An advisory panel on homelessness, created by Gov. Gavin Newsom, is floating the possibility of a state constitutional amendment to end homelessness, the Associated Press reports. The proposal would legally force cities to work toward ending homelessness within one year. It should be noted, Newsom did not include the advisory panel's recommendation in his budget proposal last week.

3. Rep. Barbara Lee believes the Democratic Party's rules for qualifying for its presidential debates is "systematically discriminatory" against candidates of color, she told the San Francisco Chronicle. People of color may not be able to afford to give contributions to candidates, nor are they widely polled as much as other groups, two main prerequisite for candidates to qualify for the debates. Tonight's debate includes no candidates of color. $$

4. Sen. Bernie Sanders is leading in a new California Democratic primary poll, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Sanders' 27 percent tops a tight pack of rivals just a few points behind him in advance of the Mar. 3 primary. Joe Biden follows with 24 percent, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren with 23 percent. $$

5. The East Bay's biggest local political race is heating up. Retiring Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty had previously endorsed state Sen. Bob Wieckowski to replace him the Tri-Valley and Fremont seat. Now, Haggerty is splitting his endorsement to include Dublin Vice Mayor Melissa Hernandez, the East Bay Citizen reports.

6. Installation of the roof for the Raiders new stadium in Las Vegas will be delayed, NBC Sports reports. The roof will not be installed until May. The stadium is set to open on July 31. The uncertainty raises the possibility there might be a few more games left for the team in Oakland, although still remote. But the team's lease at the Coliseum includes an option for the 2020 season if any problems arise with the stadium in Las Vegas.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, January 13, 2020

Monday's Briefing: 'We're not leaving,' homeless moms said after court ruling; Newsom wants to expand state parks system

Bonta wants to add bus-only lane to the Bay Bridge

by Steven Tavares
Mon, Jan 13, 2020 at 12:47 PM

A portion of the N3 Ranch that could become part of the state parks system, running through Livermore in Alameda County. - REALTOR.COM
  • Realtor.com
  • A portion of the N3 Ranch that could become part of the state parks system, running through Livermore in Alameda County.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 13:

1. Hours after an Alameda County Superior Court judge said the women that form the Moms 4 Housing coalition must leave the dwelling on Magnolia Street in Oakland, they remained defiant. “We are here. And we’re not leaving,” Dominique Walker, one of the homeless mothers said, according to KQED. On Friday, the judge said the women had no legal right to stay in the vacant house owned by a Southern California investment group.

2. The California state parks system could be significantly expanding for the first-time since the 1940s. The N3 Ranch, an 80 square-mile piece of ranch land that includes four counties, including Alameda County, is up for sale, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Gov. Gavin Newsom's state budget proposal includes funding to buy the land. $$

3. Elizabeth Echols was appointed to replace East Bay Regional Parks District Board Director Whitney Dotson, who retired last December and passed away last week, the East Bay Citizen reports.

4. A California appeals court judge ruled charter cities do not have autonomy to opt-out of the state's sanctuary city law, the Associated Press reports. A number of charter cities in Alameda County, including Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, have sanctuary city laws on the books.

5. Assemblymember Rob Bonta wants to add a bus-only lane to the Bay Bridge, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. But the plan could be expensive and complicated to design. $$

6. Fears about rising crime are becoming palpable in a number of Alameda County cities recently, despite homicides dropping. On of the reason is a spike in auto burglaries in cities all over the East Bay, the San Francisco Chronicle reports.

7. The flow of Californians moving to others states, along with declining birth rates could mean the Golden State's population growth will stop for the first time by 2060, Politico reports.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, January 10, 2020

Friday's Briefing: Judge rules Moms 4 Housing have no right to vacant home; Former Coliseum JPA exec is arraigned

Newsom unveils $222 billion state budget

by Steven Tavares
Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Members of the Moms 4 Housing coalition could be evicted from the Magnolia Street house sometime next week. - @MOMS4HOUSING ON TWITTER
  • @Moms4Housing on Twitter
  • Members of the Moms 4 Housing coalition could be evicted from the Magnolia Street house sometime next week.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 10-12:

1. The homeless mothers calling themselves "Moms 4 Housing" have no legal right to the vacant home on Magnolia Street in West Oakland, an Alameda County Superior Court judge ruled, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The women will be evicted within five days. $$

2. Scott McKibben, the former executive director of the Oakland-Alameda County Joint Powers Authority, was arraigned in Alameda County Superior Court on Friday for felony and misdemeanor conflict-of-interest charges. McKibben, also a former East Bay newspaper executive, allegedly sought $50,000 in fees from RingCentral for naming-rights to the Oakland Coliseum, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. McKibben did not enter a plea. $$

3. Gov. Gavin Newsom's $222 billion state budget includes $100 million alone in stipends for teachers in high need communities, the Associated Press reports, and health care for up to 27,000 low-income undocumented residents.

4. BART elevated interim police chief Ed Alvarez to permanent status, the East Bay Times reports. Alvarez has served 22 years with the transit authority and was selected over three other finalists for the job. $$

5. BART is also instituting an "ambassador program" that will put 10 unarmed officers on trains from the early afternoon hours through midnight, SFGate reports. The program hopes to alleviate concerns by many BART passengers that their daily commute is unsafe.

6. Berkeley's Aquatic Park is featured in a new animated short on the streaming service Disney+, SFGate reports. "Loop," created by Pixar, focuses on the interaction between a boy and an autistic girl.

7. Warnings of "endless war" now heard loudly in Washington from both sides of the aisles started nearly two decades ago with Oakland Rep. Barbara Lee. Politico takes a look at Lee's long and, for a long time, lonely push for taking back Congress' power to approve war.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Thursday's Briefing: Fate of large-scale housing project in Concord remains unclear; Newsom wants to create generic drug label

Multiple Keanu Reeves sightings in Alameda

by Steven Tavares
Thu, Jan 9, 2020 at 4:00 AM

A rendering of the sprawling, 13,000-unit housing development proposed for the Concord Naval Weapons Station in Contra Costa County.
  • A rendering of the sprawling, 13,000-unit housing development proposed for the Concord Naval Weapons Station in Contra Costa County.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 9:

1. The fate of 13,000 new housing units at the former Concord Naval Weapons Station -- the largest development project in the Bay Area -- is again up in the air, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Lennar, the developer, and the Contra Costa Building Trades are at odds over the amount of work slated for union labor. The Concord City Council spent Tuesday and Wednesday night hearing hours of testimony before directing Lennar and the union back to the negotiating table. $$

2. Gov. Gavin Newsom is proposing to lower the cost of prescription medication in California by creating a generic brand, Calmatters reports. If approved, it would make California the first state in the nation to have its own generic drug label.

3. A study by UCSF found injuries from riding e-scooters is skyrocketing, and one-in-three result in head injuries, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Meanwhile, Lime is attaching a seat to some of its e-scooters in Oakland to help disabled riders use the ubiquitous e-bikes, KPIX reports.

4. Alameda had a number of Keanu Reeves sightings in recent days, SFGate reports. Reeves is filming "The Matrix 4" in Alameda. He's been seen at Big 5 Sporting Goods at the Southshore Center and Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream.

5. Oakland Restaurant Week begins today. (For the record, its longer than a week, running for Jan. 9 to Jan. 20.) SFGate has a rundown of the restaurants you should visit.

6. Something is going recently in Warriorland other than excessive losses. The Warriors have been linked to some big names of late. Now, there are rumors they may be interested in swapping point guard D'Angelo Russell for the 76ers' uber-talented Ben Simmons, CBS Sports reports.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Wednesday's Briefing: Newsom to sign order creating $750m fund to help residents pay their rent

Alameda could have license plate readers at bridges, tube

by Steven Tavares
Wed, Jan 8, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Gov. Gavin Newson's executive order will also allow vacant state properties to be used for homeless shelters. - FILE PHOTO
  • File photo
  • Gov. Gavin Newson's executive order will also allow vacant state properties to be used for homeless shelters.


News you don't want to miss for Jan. 8:

1. Gov. Gavin Newsom will sign an executive order today to create a $750 million fund to help residents who are in danger of being evicted to pay their rent, the Associated Press reports. The order also opens up vacant state lands for use as homeless shelters.

2. Island City Opera in Alameda is shutting down its March production of "The Wreckers" because of AB5, the new state law that requires businesses to classify freelancers as employees, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

3. The Alameda City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to consider automated license plate readers near bridges, the tubes traveling to and from Oakland, and some intersections, the East Bay Times reports.

4. San Leandro does not have a limit on campaign contributions and won't have one anytime soon. The San Leandro City Council abruptly halted a year-long push by one councilmember to limit the influx of contributions by developers, the East Bay Citizen reports.

5. BART could be on the verge of improving Wi-Fi capabilities on its trains, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. "The board is set to vote Thursday on a project that would add Wi-Fi and Bluetooth infrastructure, improving the cellular network and providing a wireless internet connection at all stations and on board its new Fleet of the Future trains." $$

6. Two teens were arrested for allegedly breaking into up to 30 vehicles in Fremont early Tuesday morning, KPIX reports. Most of the damage was broken windows and most incidents occurred at a apartment complex in the city.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Tuesday’s Briefing: Wiener to unveil new SB50 bill in Oakland; Bonta unveils California Green New Deal

Nia Wilson murder trial delayed; defense attorneys ask for change of venue

by Steven Tavares
Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Cities like San Leandro have already made moves toward building density in transportation corridors, including the Marea Alta apartments across the street from the San Leandro BART station. Yet worries over losing local control also persist. - BRIDGE HOUSING
  • Bridge Housing
  • Cities like San Leandro have already made moves toward building density in transportation corridors, including the Marea Alta apartments across the street from the San Leandro BART station. Yet worries over losing local control also persist.


News you don’t want to miss for Jan. 7:

1. State Sen. Scott Wiener will join Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and state Sen. Nancy Skinner for a press conference at Oakland City Hall this morning to unveil the newest version of SB50, legislation that would encourage the building of housing density around transportation hubs. This incarnation of the bill gives municipalities local control by allowing them to opt-out of certain portions of the legislation if they create their own plans and with the same amount of new units built, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

2. Assemblymember Rob Bonta and a long list of legislators introduced the California Green New Deal on Monday, Capital Public Radio reports. Modeled after New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s well-known Green New Deal in Congress, this bill aims to further lower greenhouse emissions in the state and address social inequity issues within the climate change crisis.

3. Legislation introduced Monday by San Mateo state Sen. Jerry Hill would ban all types of flavored tobacco and vaping products in California, the Los Angeles Times reports. The Trump administration recently moved to ban most of the same products, but allowed the continued sale of menthol-flavored products to remain. Several East Bay cities have already banned the sale of flavored tobacco products, but not all have also included a menthol ban. $$

4. The trial for the man accused of killing 18-year-old Nia Wilson at the MacArthur BART station in July 2018 was delayed until next Monday, Bay City News reports. A judge was selected, but no jury chosen. The attorney for defendant, John Lee Cowell, filed a motion requesting the trial be moved out of Alameda County. Wide-spread negative press coverage surrounding the incidents means finding an impartial jury will be difficult, the attorney argued.

5. Oaklanders last month lamented the loss of Club BNB, a LGBT dance club on Franklin Street that will become a shared tech office space. But SFGate reports the non-profit Oakland Pride, which was using the club’s basement as its headquarters at no charge, is also being evicted.

6. A $25 million seismic upgrade for Alameda Hospital has begun, the East Bay Times reports. The project is slated to be complete by 2021. Without completing the seismic retrofit before 2030, the hospital risked losing its state license. There was concern among Alameda elected officials last year that Alameda Health System, the operator of the hospital, lacked urgency in finalizing the retrofit. $$

7. Things on the domestic front have been hard on Warriors coach Steve Kerr, who was ejected during Monday’s night loss to the Kings. He’s also concerned on the international front. The outspoken coach has recently set his Twitter feed ablaze with strong criticism of President Trump’s dangerous push toward war with Iran, SFGate reports. Kerr’s father was a professor at American University in Beirut and killed by Islamic jihadist.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, January 6, 2020

Monday’s Briefing: Legislature returns to work, eyes $4.2 billion climate bond; Starbucks laptop theft victim is remembered

Rented electric mopeds could be coming in Oakland

by Steven Tavares
Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 4:00 AM

State lawmakers begin the second year of the legislative two-year cycle today. - FILE PHOTO
  • File photo
  • State lawmakers begin the second year of the legislative two-year cycle today.


News you don’t want to miss for Jan. 6:

1. State lawmakers return to work in Sacramento today. Among the big issues is a proposed $4.2 billion climate bond, the Associated Press reports. The bond would help the state prepare for potential future wildfires. Any bond would first have to go before voters in the fall.

2. The California Democratic Party settled sexual assault and workplace misconduct lawsuits against its former chair Eric Bauman for $2.9 million, the Wall Street Journal reports. The lawsuits filed by former state Democratic Party employees has been a black eye for the progressive state party. Bauman became party chair in 2017 with the support of local state Sens. Nancy Skinner and Bob Wieckowski amid whispers of Bauman’s misconduct allegations that later became public. $$

3. The San Francisco Chronicle profiles the chief of Oakland’s new city department. Violence Prevention Chief Guillermo Cespedes started his new job last September and hopes to focus narrowly on specific high-crime neighborhood in Oakland with a “public health approach.” $$

4. Shun Zeng, the homicide victim in Oakland’s Montclair District on New Year’s Eve that occurred following the theft of his laptop, was remembered over the weekend, the East Bay Times reports. Police have charged two suspects. Meanwhile, Oakland Councilmember Sheng Thao, who represents Montclair in District 4, is proposing a new policy directive for police officers to return to walking beats in the Montclair District, the East Bay Citizen reports.

5. Could Concord be the Bay Area’s next tech hotspot? Forbes contributor John Cumber writes the Concord Naval Weapons Station could provide the seeds for another housing and tech boom in the East Bay. But union labor and Lennar, the developer of the proposed development that includes 13,000 new housing units, are at an impasse, the Bay City News reports. The issue comes before the Concord City Council on Tuesday night.

6. Lime keeps raising the price of its e-scooters and then there’s tax on its use in Oakland. Maybe adventurous commuters might be interested in upgrading to a rented moped? Revel, a New York startup, recently applied for a permit in Oakland to bring 1,000 electric mopeds to the city's streets, The Information reports.

$$ = Stories you may have to pay to read.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Most Popular Stories

© 2020 Telegraph Media    All Rights Reserved
Powered by Foundation