Thursday’s Briefing: Berkeley Bowl Being Sued; Is the XFL Coming to Oakland?

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Berkeley Bowl is being sued by the owners of a metal anodizing business in Emeryville for breach of contract, misrepresentation, and violating California business practices, among other actions. The suit is related to the grocery store’s 2017 purchase of 1475 67th St., where Metalco operates, and attempted eviction of the 70-year-old company. (San Francisco Chronicle)

The second iteration of the XFL — a venture owned by WWE magnate Vince McMahon — is eyeing Oakland for one of its eight franchises, according to Chris Dobbins, a member of the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Joint Powers Authority, which oversees operations of the Coliseum and Oracle Arena. The defunct XFL, which originally had hints of pro wrestling, is hoping to begin play in 2020 and will be similar to conventional football. (East Bay Citizen)

The East Bay has a new energy provider: East Bay Community Energy, which purchases solar, wind, and renewable hydroelectric energy and partners with PG&E to distribute it. Businesses in Alameda County will automatically be enrolled to receive energy this month, while residential customers will be enrolled in November. (East Bay Times)

With its third win in four years, the Golden State Warriors are looking at a massive $2 billion in contractually obligated income when the franchise moves to its new Chase Center arena in San Francisco in 2019, according to sources. (San Francisco Business Times)

To rent a two-bedroom apartment in the East Bay, a renter must earn about $45 an hour, or $93,000 a year, according to a new study released by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. In San Francisco, workers need to net $60 an hour, or about $125,000 per year. (East Bay Times)

The Berkeley City Council voted to work toward achieving a fossil fuel-free Berkeley by 2030. The council also voted to hold a climate emergency town hall meeting. (Daily Cal)

Highway 1, just south of Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park, will reopen in July — two months earlier than expected after a massive landslide in May 2017 forced the closure. (San Francisco Chronicle)

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